hiring new clinicians

Hiring new clinicians: Building a staff one hire at a time

Posted in Post-Launch
Tagged

Developing a good process for hiring new clinicians is essential to your health as an organization. It is the foundation for what your organization becomes. Why do we need to get good at it? Because inevitably as time goes on and your organization will grow and change. As it does so, it will become less of a good fit for certain employees. If we can accept that employees are actually in the best place for determining when it is time to leave, then we can more easily adjust. Acceptance then allows us to focus on what we can take charge of–a good hiring process.

The reasons you have an opening usually is either growth or someone left. If you have done an excellent job of creating demand for your services, you will need to hire. When someone leaves your practice, you will need to hire. But before the interviews begin it is well worth asking, what are candidates looking for in an employer? And more specifically, what might be attractive about joining your practice?

Different strokes for different folks

Fortunately clinicians are attracted to all sizes and types of practices. Some like the idea of a start-up and want to have a larger influence on what emerges; Others want more stability and structure; or mentoring; or independence and autonomy. And there are those who are attracted to their particular supervisor. Others care about the location. The variables are many.

The goal then is to be who you are. List out what you are offering someone who is joining. What are the opportunities associated with the position you are offering? What types of candidates might be interested in your type of organization? Where might you find those candidates? Are you looking for veterans who are looking for a space to do their thing and little else? Are you looking for the energy of youth and willing to invest in training them into more maturity?

Have a picture in your mind of the ideal candidate. You may not find an exact fit but knowing the type of employee you are looking for is a strong beginning.

Finding the candidates

We have several strategies for finding good job candidates.  First, several of our clinicians who teach a course or two at nearby graduate schools, not for the income so much as for the exposure to graduate students who might someday be candidates for our organization.

Secondly, for over 20 years, we taken 2 to 5 practicum students. These are students in graduate school who are inexperienced but will someday be out their building career’s for themselves. We are offering each practicum student a year-long job interview. By the end of it, they will know who we are. And we will know them. It does not always turn out to be a match but sometimes it does. When it does it is a very low risk hire for the both of us.

Now both of these strategies are quite long-term. One does not see immediate results from teaching or supervising. But these do build a reputation that spreads and creates an excellent foundation for our hiring.

Even with the above strategies, there are times when we still are wanting additional applicants. Our best approach has been contacting local graduate schools. Accreditation bodies are now requiring graduate schools to do a better job of tracking their graduates. That means they usually have a way of posting job opportunities on a jobs board or email distribution. We have had great success in having graduate schools help us distribute a job listing. And we have found some experienced clinicians this way.

In my view, we ought always to be vigilant for candidates who might be a fit. To do so can help us weather the trying times when turnover occurs.

Honesty in the interviews

My organization got to the size that we were nearly always interviewing clinicians. We looked for those who fit, and generally we hired about 20 percent of those we looked at. The resume may tell us that the person is not suited for our setting.

We interview some good therapists that we do not think they would be a great fit with the rest of our staff. Some need more experience. And yes, we have times when we make an offer and the candidate rejects it. There is no magic. We just can be the keepers of the process and let the chips fall where they do.

The goal of any interview is to learn about each other, to see if their is a match. In another post I have outlined our interview process. The post is called “The training we never had–Part 1: Hiring and firing.”

In my view one of the biggest mistakes we can make is “selling” a position. We must resist the temptation to try to talk someone into joining. Doing so only sets up the inevitable disappointment and disillusionment when the honeymoon is over. I want to especially talk about the downsides of our system. Over-optimism always backfires. And disgruntled employees are not fun to deal with. Do yourself a favor and be clear about what you can offer and then find people who fit.

Hiring new clinicians

After the interviews, it is time to lay share the employment contract and make to offer. We do this through an email where we outline which office, which position, the time frame we are hoping for a decision, and how they can let us know. We have them sign the contract and send it to the owner. Once they have given us a signed contract, we announce the hire to the rest of our staff.

Orienting them

There is more to do after hiring new clinicians. We need to train them and to orient them to the habits that lead to success. An online software tool called Remarkable Start helps us present start-up materials. Remarkable Start distributes YouTube videos that we use to teach the effective use of our software. And we have about 30 documents that they can read and comment about. The system is fantastic for bringing new hires up to speed. They are more confident in who we are. They feel cared for. And they learn more rapidly than any other system we have tried.

Other posts:

The dilemma of success: Do it myself or delegate

Building culture through regular meetings

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *